Quotables

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By Lisa | Filed in Quotables | No comments yet.

“Whatever our bedtime was as kids, we could stay up an extra half hour if we were reading. My parents didn’t care as long as I was under the spell of a Stephen King or a Douglas Adams. Now I read in bed. I read at work. I read standing in line. It’s like, ‘Hello, my name is Nathan and I am a reader.’”

Nathan Fillion

We had much the same rule at my house – not only did Mom not care if I read under the covers with a flashlight, she made sure the flashlight had good, strong batteries!

Teaser Tuesday

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By Lisa | Filed in Teaser Tuesdays | No comments yet.

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. You know the rules: grab your current read, open to a random page and share a two sentence teaser with us (no spoilers!). Be sure to tell us about the book, so we can add it to our TBR list!

This week, my teaser is from Above by Isla Morley:

 “Carrying the weight of the world, that’s what I feel like I’m doing when I lift the boy up in my arms. I lay him on my cot and cover him with the quilt, and then force myself back to the kitchen seat so I won’t be tempted to pick him up and hold him some more.”

 

Quotables

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By Lisa | Filed in Quotables | No comments yet.

“Some of the most famous books are the least worth reading. Their fame was due to their having done something that needed to be doing in their day. The work is done and the virtue of the book has expired.”

Moliere, French actor and playwright

I definitely think some classics fall into this category — they were important in their day, but they aren’t as relevant today.

Review: Starers by Nathan Robinson

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By Lisa | Filed in Book Review, Horror | No comments yet.

Starers_Nathan_RobinsonThis one is from my personal library, recommended by someone on my Bookapalooza thread, and let me tell you: Starers by Nathan Robinson is one seriously creepy book! A little horror, a little family drama, maybe a little religion – and a lot of creepy suspense. This was a great one-sitting read.

Dylan Keene is heading home from a night at the pub, his deadbeat brother in tow. Standing at the bus stop across the street from the house is an old man. Dylan doesn’t give him much thought – but he’s still there the following morning. Even more disturbing is the fact that he’s not alone, there are other people out there, staring at the Keene household.

And it doesn’t stop. As the day wears on, more and more people gather to stare at them, leaving Dylan, his wife, Kirsty, his daughter, Lucy, and his brother, Lennon. The Starers don’t react to anything. They are in various stages of dress (and undress). There are accidents, but they don’t move. They don’t eat, they don’t sit down, they don’t even blink – they just stare at the Keene’s house…and every time they look outside, there are more of them.

Creepy enough for you? Honestly, the thought of being locked in the house with my family is bad enough, but creepy staring people on the lawn? No thanks!

There are a few issues with this one. It could use a bit of editing, I think – I found some of the phrasing awkward and grammar issues make me grit my teeth. Still, I had great fun with it, trying to guess what the ending would be. One of the best things about getting books for my Kindle is that for very little money, I can pick up some really cool books – this is definitely one of them.

My copy of Starersis from my personal library.

Teaser Tuesday

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By Lisa | Filed in Teaser Tuesdays | No comments yet.

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. You know the rules: grab your current read, open to a random page and share a two sentence teaser with us (no spoilers!). Be sure to tell us about the book, so we can add it to our TBR list!

This week, my teaser is from The Sound of Broken Glass by Deborah Crombie:

“But this, this was just between Andy and the guitar, and there was a grace and confidence to his playing that took her breath away. She felt, as she listened and watched him, that she knew him in a way that she had never known anyone else.”

It’s a murder mystery, but that passage really spoke to me.

 

Quotables

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By Lisa | Filed in Quotables | No comments yet.

“While we are reading, we are all Don Quixote.”

Mason Colley, American aphorist

One of the great things about reading is the way that it lets us live other lives and play other roles.

Teaser Tuesday

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By Lisa | Filed in New Books | No comments yet.

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. You know the rules: grab your current read, open to a random page and share a two sentence teaser with us (no spoilers!). Be sure to tell us about the book, so we can add it to our TBR list!

This week, my teaser is from William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back:

LUKE:    Darth Vader: legendary is his pow’r.
But Master, hath the dark side greater strength?

Review: Vintage by Susan Gloss

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By Lisa | Filed in Book Review, Chick Lit | One comment

VintageHC-C-1-e1386603710842I don’t generally review a lot of women’s lit, but the story behind Vintage  by Susan Gloss really spoke to me. I love the idea that items in a thrift store all have stories behind them! Someone wore the dress you’re trying on, the shoes, the wedding gown; someone sat at the table or read the books. Were those happy times? Did a beloved grandchild play with that teddy bear? I find it infinitely fascinating. In Vintage we meet some of the people behind those stories.

There are three women at the heart of the story. Violet Turner owns Hourglass Vintage in Madison, Wisconsin. Violet has always been a little out of step with her peers;  even in high school she had a retro style. She’s built this business – the perfect location, carefully selected vintage items, a growing clientele – and now she may lose it.

April is 18, an orphan, and pregnant. She bought a wedding dress at Hourglass — and returned it almost immediately. Amithi is still reeling from a terrible betrayal when she brings Violet a stack of beautiful Indian garments. While Violet navigates the turbulent waters of a new romance, the three women hatch a plan to save Hourglass, and maybe themselves along with it.

Okay, it’s definitely chick lit, but I don’t say that as a bad thing. It’s about women, about women on their own, making their own way without a man. Yes, there’s some romance, but it is really about three women who are (or are becoming) self-reliant. They can’t deal with the men in the story until they have their own lives under control – that was a theme that definitely appealed to me. Although I was a little disappointed in one big decision in the book, for the most part these women dig in their heels and refuse to be pushed around.

I really enjoyed Vintage, and I think it will make a great summer read. Telling the story with the items in the shop was a clever way to tie old stories in with new ones, and it really played to my love of thrift store finds and their imagined histories. My copy of Vintage was an Advanced Reader Copy, provided free of charge. Sadly, it has disappeared from my Kindle (those blasted self-deleting ARCs!), but you can pre-order yours on Amazon, or pick it up at your favorite bookstore on March 25th.

For more on Susan Gloss and her work, visit her website. For more on other new releases from William Morrow, check out their website.

Quotables

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By Lisa | Filed in Quotables | No comments yet.

“Sometimes, reading a blog, which I do infrequently, I see that generations of Americans have been wilfully crippled, and can no longer spell or write a sentence.”

Alice Walker, author and activist

A friend of mine jokes that I’m the only person she knows who uses semi colons in text messages. I agree that text speak is damaging our language, but it started long before iPhones. There are different ways to communicate and a lot of young people have been kind of cut off from more formal kinds of communication. I think it has opened a divide between younger and older adults.

New on the Shelves…

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By Lisa | Filed in New Books | 2 comments

aboveI don’t think this is one that I requested, but it sounds fascinating. I can’t wait to get a chance to dig into Above by Isla Morley:

Blythe Hallowell is sixteen when she is abducted by a survivalist and locked away in an aban­doned missile silo in Eudora, Kansas. At first, she focuses frantically on finding a way out, until the harrowing truth of her new existence settles in—the crushing loneliness, the terrifying madness of a captor who believes he is saving her from the end of the world, and the persistent temptation to give up. But nothing prepares Blythe for the burden of raising a child in confinement. Deter­mined to give the boy everything she has lost, she pushes aside the truth about a world he may never see for a myth that just might give mean­ing to their lives below ground. Years later, their lives are ambushed by an event at once promis­ing and devastating. As Blythe’s dream of going home hangs in the balance, she faces the ultimate choice—between survival and freedom.

Above is a riveting tale of resilience in which “stunning” (Daily Beast) new literary voice Isla Morley compels us to imagine what we would do if everything we had ever known was taken away. Like the bestselling authors of Room and The Lovely Bones before her, Morley explores the unthinkable with haunting detail and tenderly depicts our boundless capacity for hope.